Thursday, March 31, 2011

MEMENTO NORA by Angie Smibert

This week is the epic launch of MEMENTO NORA by Angie Smibert, which comes out tomorrow! From Angie's website:

Summary: Nora, the popular girl and happy consumer, witnesses a horrific bombing on a shopping trip with her mother. In Nora’s near-future world, terrorism is so commonplace that she can pop one little white pill to forget and go on like nothing ever happened.

However, when Nora makes her first trip to a Therapeutic Forgetting Clinic, she learns what her mother, a frequent forgetter, has been frequently forgetting. Nora secretly spits out the pill and holds on to her memories. The memory of the bombing as well as her mother’s secret and her budding awareness of the world outside her little clique make it increasingly difficult for Nora to cope. She turns to two new friends, each with their own reasons to remember, and together they share their experiences with their classmates through an underground comic. They soon learn, though, they can’t get away with remembering.

Fascinating, yes? YES. I mean, pop a pill and forget? To help Angie celebrate MEMENTO NORA, I'm going to spill a memory I never want to forget.

Mine feels small, but it's important to me. It's sort of what launched me into my critique group, and how I squirm my way into many conversations--and thus, friendships--on twitter or wherever.

It's called eavesdropping.

That's right. I met my critique partners by eavesdropping on two fabulous girls in the lunch line of my very first writer's conference. I'd been "a writer" for approximately three months, and I attended the conference alone.

The girls were talking about doing a YA group, and I stood up straighter and listened harder. Then I just inserted myself right into that convo, got their information, and the rest is history.

I don't ever want to forget that sometimes, all it takes to get/do/become something amazing is to speak up.

What memory would you never want to forget?

You can enter to win a nice prize pack o' stuff, including a signed copy of Memento Nora, a purse charm bracelet, temporary tattoos, and other swag.


How? Simple. Each week, leave a comment on the featured blog--that's THIS POST. And over on Angie's site. Each weekly comment earns you a point (which in this case equals an entry in the random drawing). In other words, if you comment on every week, you get 8 points... er, entries. Angie will randomly select a winner and announce it April 7.


Check out what the other Bookanistas are up to this week at the Reading Room.

Or on their blogs:

30 comments:

Natalie Aguirre said...

That's funny that you found your critique group by eavesdropping. That's how we found out about adopting from China and our adoption agency. Well, my husband did while I was at a meeting. It was one of the most important decisions of our life.

BTW, I just started Possession last night and am loving it. Great story!

Hannah Kincade said...

Oooh, this sounds intriguing. I will definitely add this one to my list. Thanks!!

Vicki Rocho said...

A timely memory -- I'm going to my first conference next week!

Jessy said...

I would never want to forget being teased in elementary school. I think it made me a stronger person.

Heather Hellmann said...

I love the story of how you formed a critique group. Memento Nora sounds really good.

Jessi said...

Good to see you back Elana! Hope you're feeling better. Love your memory. Wish I was cool enough to do stuff like that.

This book's on my list for sure!

Tore said...

Our son is adopted. I would never want to forget the day our son was born. We were there. Also, getting to hold him for the first time. I was crying. Tore923@aol.com

L.T. Elliot said...

I'd never want to forget a moment with my kids. Okay, maybe I'd want to forget a few of those fun-filled sick days but other than that...nope, even then I'd want to remember. They're more cuddly when they're sick.

I love the whole idea behind this book. I can't wait to read it!

Michelle Merrill said...

Ooh, most of the memories I'd keep are sentimental ones. Like, remembering my kids as babies or, you know, the day I got married.

I love your memory, though! Eavesdropping can be a good thing :)

Matthew MacNish said...

You're back! YAY! That is an awesome story about finding your CPs. I've known about Angie from the league, and this story sounds very cool.

Jennifer Hoffine said...

Cool stories, both the book and how you met your crit partners.

Melody said...

Wow, what bravery to eavesdrop and then step into the conversation! I would be petrified. :)

And yes, count me in to win a copy of MEMENTO NORA! It sounds intriguing. :)

Tere Kirkland said...

Heh, I eavesdrop on people all the time when I eat my lunch in Jackson Square. I call it "research".

This sounds like a great read. Thanks for your review!

Bee said...

What an exciting book! I want to read this NOW.

Memory I wouldn't wanna forget? All that time I spent with my grandpa. I wouldn't wanna forget a moment for the world.

Colene Murphy said...

That's an awesome memory!! I'm bad about forgetting long ago things. I can remember every one I have talked to today in order, but I can't remember things that happened last year. So I am very adamant about remembering exactly how my hubs and I met and dating and everything.

VERY awesome swag prize! Can't wait to get my copy!

Pam Torres said...

Another great book for the TBR list that is growing everyday. For every one book I read I add at least 10 more. It is nice to know that you were once at the stage I am. Had planned to go to my first conference but missed the deadline for registration now it's closed. Bummer! I have found one great crit partner and need to find more and of course some beta readers. I'm getting closer to a finished manuscript! Yea me!

Nisa said...

What an awesome memory! Who ever said eavesdropping was a bad thing! There are so many things I don't want to ever forget, but when it comes down to it, they can all be clumped together in the shows of kindness I have received from others. I want to remember that and keep the kindnesses going in turn.

jpetroroy said...

This sounds fascinating--and what a stunning cover!

Em-Musing said...

Memory? I want to keep each and every one of them. That's why I take CoQ10 :) Hey, glad you're feeling better.

Elle Strauss said...

Sounds like a terrific read!

Karen Lange said...

So you're feeling better? :) Hope so.

Memories I never want to forget...there are many, including ones on vacation in WY with my family.

Michael Offutt said...

You know, I just wanted to comment that the idea of a forgetting clinic would so work for me. I don't have unpleasant memories per se...but sometimes when I've read a super good book, I'd like to forget it so that I could pick it up and read it again and be like, "Wow...this book is amazing!"

Cheree said...

Ooh, I so want to read this book. It sounds fantastic. I can't wait to get it.

Theresa Milstein said...

How cool you were brave enough to join the conversation. I was so shy my first conference.

I'm looking forward to reading this book. Commonplace terrorism sounds like a plausible and scary future.

I wish I could capture exactly how someone smells and looks in a memory. As children age, I can't really see them or smell them back in their small sweet-smelling sweetness.

Josh Hoyt said...

The book sounds really cool. It sounds like it has some deep thinking involved with it. I would never want to forget about all the tough times because then nothing would seem that great. Although I wouldn't mind a few future ones not happening (:

Jemi Fraser said...

Who knew eavesdropping could be that helpful??? :)

One of the memories I'd never want to forget is watching my son score his first goal in hockey :)

Lydia K said...

Funny and not at all weird. Who doesn't eavesdrop once in a while?
;)

Memento Nora sounds great and the title is amazing!

Vivien said...

I eavesdrop a lot as well. It's like a hobby. Along with people watching.

Vivien
deadtossedwaves at gmail dot com

mariska said...

Happy to have you back :) and i'm soo looking forward to read this book !

uniquas at ymail dot com

Ishta Mercurio said...

I love dystopians. I love dystopians. I love dystopians.

Interestingly, we aren't far from the reality of pill-popping to forget. This is why I love dystopians.

As for a memory I never want to forget, it's the memory of holding my first son in my arms when he was an infant. Thinking about the shape of his little head in that moment, the near weightlessness of him, just reminds me how precious life is, how fragile we are. I don't ever want to forget that.

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